Search Results for: kopin golden-i

Kopin Golden-i wearable PC hands-on [Video]

Kopin Golden-i wearable PC hands-on [Video]

Don't let anybody tell you tech blogging is all glamour; sometimes in the name of a great story - and showcasing a fantastic gadget - you end up looking pretty darn ridiculous.  Wearable computing specialists Kopin were walking the MWC 2010 show floor giving demonstrations of their Golden-i head-mounted PC, which promises a 15-inch virtual display that can be voice-controlled while leaving your hands free.  Check out our first-impressions and a demo video after the cut.

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Kopin Golden-i Gen.2 wearable computer on course for 2010 launch

Kopin Golden-i Gen.2 wearable computer on course for 2010 launch

Oh, how we laughed at Kopin's Golden-i wearable computer when the company showed us renders earlier in the year; even though they promised it was heading to production, we were still dubious.  The joke is on us, it seems, as Kopin have announced that the Golden-i Gen 2 will be entering field trials in December this year, with production kicking off in earnest next year.  Units are expected to have a Bluetooth headset, 15-inch virtual PC display, head-gesture recognition and voice-control.

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Kopin Golden-i wearable computer headed for production

Kopin Golden-i wearable computer headed for production

Kopin have come up with a head-mounted "virtual 15-inch display" to show off their new CyberDisplay micro-panel, a 0.6-inch screen capable of 800 x 600 resolution.  The Kopin Golden-i concept - which they've given Motorola branding - integrates the CyberDisplay into a swing-down boom arm, linked to a hefty Bluetooth headset running Windows CE 6.0 R2 and supporting voice-recognition.

Video demo after the cut

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Kopin outs Golden-i Gen 3.8: Faster, lighter wearable computer

Kopin outs Golden-i Gen 3.8: Faster, lighter wearable computer

Kopin and Motorola Solutions got the original Golden-i wearable computer to market ahead of Google's Glass, but the HC1 headset was hardly fashionable; now, Kopin is back with Golden-i Gen 3.8, a slicker redesign. Half the size and weight of the HC-1, the Golden-i 3.8 is now foldable for easier transportation when you're not wearing it, and is 16x more powerful than its predecessor; it also adds in new camera technology, including image stabilization for keeping a level shot even when you're moving.

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Kopin Pupil hands-on: Glass tech without geek looks

Kopin Pupil hands-on: Glass tech without geek looks

Kopin has revealed its latest wearable system, Pupil, a combination of a micro-display and voice control noise-cancellation system the company hopes will eventually be used in head-worn tech like Google's Glass. A reference design intending to show how wearable computing could be integrated into a design that's more palatable to the consumer market, Pupil isn't intended for the market in its current form, but is instead intended to showcase the fruits of Kopin's new partnership with Olympus in display technology. We caught up with Kopin to find out more.

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Golden-i takes on Project Glass

Golden-i takes on Project Glass

A couple of decades ago, wearable displays and head-mounted computers were the stuff of spy stories science fiction - which is certainly where Kopin, Inc. seems to have gotten the inspiration for Golden-i. They're calling their new device a head-mounted computer, with a bevy of integrated sensors and radios to help it along. Instead of acting like a more techy version of glasses like Google's Project Glass, the Golden-i is designed to actually fit over standard glasses or safety goggles giving it applications in all sorts of industrial capacities. Golden-i will make another trade show appearance at CTIA.

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Glass hits operating theater as wearable tech boosts cancer surgery

Glass hits operating theater as wearable tech boosts cancer surgery

"OK Glass, show me an X-ray." Surgeons at Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital are turning to Glass to summon patient records and more, with the hospital the first to use Google's wearable during abdominal surgery. Two physicians, Dr. Szotek and Dr. Jeff Browne, each sported Glass during the four-hour procedure, relying on Google's voice control to access medical information as they sliced out a tumor.

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HC1 wearable computer turns paramedics into cyborgs

HC1 wearable computer turns paramedics into cyborgs

Augmented reality wearable gizmos aren't just for finding your friends and skydiving; one of the first practical uses for the Motorola Solutions HC1 has arrived, and it hopes to keep you alive when you're on your way to hospital. Paramedic Pro runs on the headset - developed from the Kopin Golden-i platform - and allows emergency first-responders to query medical records, log vital signs, hold two-way conversations with doctors and specialists, and flag up their location, all without taking their hands off a stethoscope.

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Motorola Solutions HC1 wearable computer is your engineer’s Google Glass

Motorola Solutions HC1 wearable computer is your engineer’s Google Glass

A new wearable computer has gone on sale, with Motorola Solutions hoping that enterprise users will gladly sacrifice some style if it means they have both hands and a database-worth of information at all times. The Motorola HC1, based on Kopin's Golden-i wearables technology, may not have the slick aesthetic of Google's Glass, but for those in defense, utilities, telecommunications, aerospace, and aviation industries, it opens up persistent connectivity and remote support to the work day.

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Forget Embarrassment, I’d Wear Google’s AR Glasses

Forget Embarrassment, I’d Wear Google’s AR Glasses

I'm a geek, an early-adopter and a lover of science-fiction; I also have relatively little shame: of course I'm the ideal target audience for Google Glasses. If the rumors are to be believed, Google's wily engineers have used their "20-percent time" to cook up some Android-powered digital goggles, overlaying augmented reality data onto the real-world view. The first generation is likely to be oversized and expensive, but I'll still probably buy them anyway and wear them with pride. Here's why, and what I think Google needs to do if its Google Glasses are to succeed.

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