Results for "jawbone bluetooth headset"

HTC One M9 Review – Gambling on Quality

HTC One M9 Review – Gambling on Quality

What does it take to create a smartphone design classic? For the HTC One M9, the answer is relentless refinement, improving what worked in its metal-bodied predecessors rather than chasing the latest trends. The smartphone spec arms-race is relentless, however, notable as much for its hyperbole as the minimal attention span of would-be buyers in carrier stores. If you can’t make your case in seconds, you’re going to lose the sale. Amid fierce competition, HTC doesn’t exactly have the greatest track record of playing up its strengths and capitalizing on its advantages. Has that changed in the One M9?

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Amazon Fire Phone review: The shopper’s smartphone

Amazon Fire Phone review: The shopper’s smartphone

When Amazon wades into a new segment, competitors take note, and few devices have been so nervously anticipated as the Fire Phone. Amazon's first smartphone doesn't just put Prime in your pocket, it also pushes the limits of UI, with its quartet of Dynamic Perspective cameras, and computational photography, with Firefly. Ambitious, then, but Jeff Bezos & Co. have seldom lacked that. Question is, does the Fire Phone deserve to be the hottest handset in town?

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Plantronics Voyager Edge Review

Plantronics Voyager Edge Review

Plantronics knows a thing or two about Bluetooth headsets, being one of the stalwarts of the industry, but the new Voyager Edge still has something unusual to it. Fitting in-between Plantronics’ Legend and Discovery lines of earpieces, the Voyager Edge claims to pair the performance of the former with the style of the latter, in a headset suitable for both home and office. There’s some strong competition from Jawbone’s Era, however; read on to find out which deserves a spot on your ear.

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Plantronics Voyager Edge hands-on

Plantronics Voyager Edge hands-on

Plantronics' latest Bluetooth headset, the Voyager Edge, wants to be all things to all people. Slotting into the company's Voyager range - known for their excellent performance but, even Plantronics admits, somewhat "call center" appearance - but with the style of the more consumer-centric Discovery range, the Voyager Edge is also Plantronics' first real attempt to reposition Bluetooth headsets as smart wearables, not just accessories. We caught up with the company to try the Voyager Edge out and see what makes it so special.

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Back to School Tech Guide 2013

Back to School Tech Guide 2013

Heading back to school can be a stressful time, but getting up to speed with your technology choices needn't cause you sleepless nights. SlashGear has picked out the key technology to get you up and running when you're headed back to your dorm room, including options for the student on a tighter budget. Read on for our run-down on what should be in your bag, on your ears, and helping you avoid the dreaded "freshman 15".

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Fitbit Flex Review

Fitbit Flex Review

If headsets like Glass are pushing the wearable computing boundaries, then fitness monitors like the new Fitbit Flex are entry-level cyborg tech for the mass market. Announced back at CES 2013, and taking on Nike's stylish Fuelband and Jawbone's twice-refined UP, the Flex promises to track your performance whether you're awake or asleep, along with real-time data transfer to your smartphone without a big hit on battery life. That's even though the Flex is cheaper than UP, falling just under that all-important $100 boundary. Is this the health tracker we've been waiting for? Read on for the full SlashGear review.

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Will Wearables Fuel – or Fracture – Convergence?

Will Wearables Fuel – or Fracture – Convergence?

The candid snapshot of Google exec Sergey Brin, riding the subway on a $2.25 fare while sporting a Glass prototype worth thousands of dollars, has reignited questions around ubiquitous computing. That sighting of Brin is a timely one. Not only is Google's Glass Foundry developer schedule kicking off at the end of January, but several other wearables projects have reached milestones this month; Vuzix brought out prototypes of its Glass rival a few weeks back, while Kickstarter success Memoto applied some extra-sensor balm to the sting of an unexpected hardware delay today.

As each project tracks toward release, however, the ecosystem of more straightforward body-worn gadgetry such as activity monitors like Jawbone's UP picks up for what's predicted to be a bumper year of sales. Still, among sensor ubiquity and the specter of power paucity, the fledgling wearables industry hasn't apparently decided whether it'll face this brave new augmented world hand-in-hand, or jealously guarding its data.

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CES 2013 wrap-up: Accessories steal the show

CES 2013 wrap-up: Accessories steal the show

In some ways, one could argue that CES 2013 was really all about the accessories. Sure, a lot of companies where there unveiling new hardware, whether that hardware was a massive TV, a new gaming tablet, or a phone that has an eInk display on the backside, but there were more accessories than we care to count being shown on the floor. Each of these accessories seemed to offer something unique; each was newsworthy in it's own particular way. There were some that caught more attention than others, naturally, but nearly every accessory we saw is bound to get someone, somewhere excited.

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Google Glass bone conduction earpiece tipped for private audio

Google Glass bone conduction earpiece tipped for private audio

Google has used bone conduction for its Project Glass wearable computer, it's claimed, promising discrete notifications that only the wearer themselves can hear. The headset makes contact with the mastoid process, linked directly to the middle ear, insiders tell Geek, meaning any audio output - such as new messages, Google+ alerts, or other notifications - is piped in directly, completely inaudible to those around the Glass owner, and yet can still be perceived despite high background noise.

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