Results for "internet of things"

Gripes of a Cable Cutter (and why Internet TV will solve them)

Gripes of a Cable Cutter (and why Internet TV will solve them)

Cable-cutting -- the act of cancelling your cable or satellite subscription to join the ranks of occasionally holier-than-thou set-top-boxers -- is a slowly growing change to how many get their daily entertainment fix. Benefits abound for cutting the cable, and you've likely heard the tropes by now: lower cost, better access to content in the moment, and the reality that cable-cutting better fits with many viewers' schedules (if you're time-shifting all your shows around your work schedule, there's little point in keeping a traditional cable subscription, after all).

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Nest Thermostat now heating things up in the UK

Nest Thermostat now heating things up in the UK

Giving in to incessant requests, Nest, which is now owned by Google, has finally brought its Learning Thermostat to the UK. But due to differences in how heating works in the country across the pond, Nest's smart thermostat works a little differently from those that have already been in the market in the US and Canada.

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US ceding Internet control

US ceding Internet control

You may call it a face-saving effort, but it looks like the Obama administration is taking some good measures to do damage control after the NSA disclosures fiasco. Presently, the Commerce Department of the U.S. government has a hold over the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN. This is a body that manages Internet names and addresses and other technical functions that assist computers across the globe to find correct servers and websites. When their contract expires in 2015, the governing agency plans to give up its control and put into place a neutral alternative.

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Net Neutrality is a mess: We can’t even decide what the Internet is

Net Neutrality is a mess: We can’t even decide what the Internet is

The internet as we know it is in peril. Verizon's victory in the court of appeal this week, seeing the FCC's attempts to regulate broadband providers in the name of Net Neutrality defeated, has the potential to change how we access the internet and web services like Netflix, Hulu, and others more fundamentally than 2013's SOPA threatened to. In question isn't whether internet access should be a free-for-all, but what it is fundamentally, legally classified as, and who therefore has control over what gets shuttled through: Verizon and the broadband providers, in control of the "pipes", or the FCC as protector of infrastructure that uses public rights of way. For all both sides are claiming some degree of victory this week, we're still no closer to settling that fundamental question.

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Bill Gates, Zuckerberg fund non-profit to bring public schools broadband Internet

Bill Gates, Zuckerberg fund non-profit to bring public schools broadband Internet

The Internet is an integral part of modern education, and not only provides many different elements of supplemental education -- video tutorials, instructional websites, etc. -- it also is necessary for specific fields of study, like programming. The problem is that many public schools in the United States (approximately 80%) do not have adequate broadband speeds, something that a non-profit recently backed by Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg wants to change.

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