Results for "honda asimo"

Honda ASIMO learns sign-language and masters stairs

Honda ASIMO learns sign-language and masters stairs

Honda has revealed a new version of ASIMO, its humanoid robot, now able to climb stairs smoothly and communicate using sign language. Shown off in New York this week, ASIMO may look the same as before to the casual glance, but Honda has in fact reworked both the upper and lower body, including adding extra degrees of freedom to the hands so that they can be used for more precise tasks.

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ASIMO goes autonomous: Honda robot divorces operator

ASIMO goes autonomous: Honda robot divorces operator

Honda's ASIMO robot has been given a new round of upgrades, slimming down and gaining the ability to autonomously monitor and interact with its environment, out of the control of a human operator. Advanced balancing - including quick reactions when ASIMO senses it's falling - together with an array of sensors that track physical objects and moving people, and predictive response algorithms that can independently decide on the next course of action all come together and shift the robot another step closer to integrating into a public environment.

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Honda’s ASIMO Had A Few Drinks And Falls Again

Honda’s ASIMO Had A Few Drinks And Falls Again

Well, you all saw the recent fall of Honda's ASIMO robot and you thought it was over; not so. I came across an older video of ASIMO and this time he made it up the stairs but didn't quite make it downstairs in one piece. Honda's Humanoid Robot is currently an overprice piece of machinery and technology that continues to make the audiences laugh. ASIMO's job is to make us smile and ponder Honda's greatness but it fails again in the featured video. The Humanoid cost an estimated $1 million to manufacture in addition to thousands more for maintenance. Lets not forget the repair cost when ASIMO trips over thick-air, which doesn't exist.

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ASIMO, which stands for Advanced Step in Innovative Mobility, has an excellent track record versus the competition, but as technology progresses it seems to fall more and more. Honda boasts that ASIMO is a "glimpse into the future", which sorta makes sense when you consider people will eventually fall and slip on ice or something they didn't notice. We're just following in ASIMO's footsteps.

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Honda demo Walking Assist exoskeleton for elderly & disabled

Honda demo Walking Assist exoskeleton for elderly & disabled

We've seen exoskeleton suits designed to grant their wearers super-human strength, but they tend to look somewhat obvious.  Fine if you're an attention-seeking superhero, but less of a selling point if you're an elderly person with mobility problems.  Honda have thankfully come to the rescue, though, with their 'Walking Assist Device'; worn as a straightforward belt with thigh straps, the 2.8kg unit promises to lengthen a user's natural stride by supplementing their own muscle power.

Asimo’s cockiness gets the better of him

Asimo’s cockiness gets the better of him

Consider this a SlashGear public service announcement if you will.  Robots, no matter how adept they consider themselves, should always look where they're going when climbing stairs.  Witness this embarrassing fall by Honda's lauded Asimo, which ironically happened while he was boasting about the in-feet sensors that allow him to balance.

Thankfully the Honda nurses were quick with the screens, as the crumpled humanoid lay twitching gently on the floor still chunnering about his ability to strut with the best of them.  Perhaps it's time for Asimo to check into rehab?  We can only assume that he's on so many drugs that he doesn't even realise he's fallen.  Rumours that as the stricken robot was stretchered back to the workshop he was heard deliriously muttering "I'm still a star!" are so far unconfirmed.

Asimo: 'Help me, I've fallen and I can't get up!' [Pink Tentacle]

Toyota rehab robots boost bionic leg and balance game

Toyota rehab robots boost bionic leg and balance game

Toyota is rolling out new versions of its assist robotics, updating its "bionic leg" and balance-gamification system for rehabilitation and testing them out in Japanese hospitals. The Walk Training Assist and Balance Training Assist hardware aim to help paralyzed or recovering patients to regain their mobility skills, and are now more responsive to different degrees of rehab.

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