Results for "google project loon"

Google Project Loon test flights to take place in Australia

Google Project Loon test flights to take place in Australia

Google is set to test fly its large balloons, which are part of Project Loon, over Australia next month. Project Loon balloons are designed to beam internet service to residents on the ground. Project Loon is a plan that Google has talked about in the past and hopes to use to give internet connectivity to remote parts of the world. The balloons themselves are able to circle the globe on stratospheric winds.

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Google Project Loon explains smart balloons for flocking internet

Google Project Loon explains smart balloons for flocking internet

Google borrowed flocking patterns from birds for early design of its ambitious Project Loon, rolling out blanket coverage simulations to prove to naysayers that delivering wireless internet access from the stratosphere is practical. While some have questioned how the project expects to be able to consistently provide service when the mesh-networking balloons responsible are moving at speed through the changeable atmospheric winds, Project Loon pointed to research done by one of the search giant's Rapid Evaluators that proves it can be achieved.

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Google marks Project Loon’s balloon birthday with LTE tests

Google marks Project Loon’s balloon birthday with LTE tests

Google's Project Loon has celebrated its first birthday by delivering internet access to a remote Brazilian school, floating a balloon-borne LTE connection as it demonstrates the system has wings rather than being full of hot air. Announced last year, Project Loon aims to use a network of high-altitude balloons circling the globe to fill in empty gaps in internet service, a scheme which although derided as ridiculous at first, is now looking increasingly practical.

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Google’s Project Loon dissects a global Internet balloon antenna

Google’s Project Loon dissects a global Internet balloon antenna

Some of the technical details behind Google's Project Loon were revealed in a recent video explaining the inner workings of one of its global Internet antenna balloons. Network engineering lead Cyrus Behroozi popped off the top half of one of the bulbous shells to point out the various parts of its two main components: a radio and the antenna itself. The design, Behrozi said, was intentionally simple, but it could become more sophisticated over time as the prototypes continue in their development.

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Google’s Project Loon uses giant balloons to bring affordable Internet

Google’s Project Loon uses giant balloons to bring affordable Internet

On May 24, we reported on a tip that Google plans to launch wireless Internet service in emerging markets that have little or no access to the Internet. While the leaked details were extensive, one bit stuck out among the rest: the use of balloons to transmit signals over long distances. At least that aspect of the rumor has turned out to be true, with Google announcing the method as Project Loon.

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Google takes over NASA’s Moffett Field for aviation, robotics

Google takes over NASA’s Moffett Field for aviation, robotics

In an interesting agreement, Google will take control of NASA’s Moffett Field. the 60-year agreement will see Google invest up to $200 million in the property. Though they’re operating and investing in the air strip, which previously used by Google as a private airstrip, NASA will ultimately retain ownership. According to NASA, Google’s Planetary Ventures LLC branch, a shell company for investment purposes, will dole out $1.16 billion over the contract, and reduce NASA’s operating cost by $6.3 million annually.

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Surprise: A Google exec just broke the parachute altitude record

Surprise: A Google exec just broke the parachute altitude record

A senior vice president at Google has broken Felix Baumgartner's world record for a high altitude parachute jump, with Alan Eustace hurtling from 135,908 feet - in excess of 25 miles - in a special suit crafted in top secret. Eustace took around two hours to climb into the stratosphere underneath a helium balloon, then cut his connection with a well-placed explosive charge and began a descent which saw him pass 800 mph and require him to deploy his main parachute in less than five minutes.

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