Results for "google privacy"

UK Safari users now able to sue Google over cookies

UK Safari users now able to sue Google over cookies

Safari users in the UK have won the right to sue Google. The judgement, which potentially paves the way for a series of lawsuits, comes about as the result of the Court of Appeals, where Google was fighting the case being heard at all. a group of users claim Google was bypassing Apple’s privacy settings for Safari and installing ‘cookies’ meant to track their Internet activity. While plaintiffs applaud the ruling, Google is “disappointed with the court's decision.”

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Google Chairman says Glass ‘fundamental’ for Google

Google Chairman says Glass ‘fundamental’ for Google

Is Google Glass dead, or do we just wish it were? When Google demolished the ‘Explorer program’ for Google Glass, they quickly seated Glass under the watchful eye of Tony Fadell, who heads up Google’s de facto hardware arm, Nest. Over time, various talking heads have said Glass wasn’t gone, just regrouping. The latest to chime in is former Google CEO and current Chairman Eric Schmidt, who calls Glass “fundamental” for Google, and says Fadell and his team are going to “make it ready for users”.

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Google X head: unmitigated hype helped kill Google Glass

Google X head: unmitigated hype helped kill Google Glass

Whether we like it or not, and some might actually do, Google Glass as we knew it is practically dead. Whether it comes back in the same form or, hopefully, a better one, only Google, and time, knows. But for now, we are left to ponder what went wrong. In Google Glass' case, it could have been and probably was a great many things and Astro Teller, who heads Google's experimental arm Google X, sheds light on one of those reasons: Google's very own, uncontrolled hype machine.

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Google softens Android full-disk encryption requirement

Google softens Android full-disk encryption requirement

Encryption has become a touchy subject. What was once was, and still is, a standard way to protect data has become controversial in light of recent events. But while most tech companies hailed its privacy and security benefits, few, especially on the mobile device sector, choose to enforce it. It seems that, at least for the time being, the cause has lost one strong proponent. Google has rather quietly revised its Android 5.0 compatibility requirements to let OEMs choose whether to enable full-disk encryption or not.

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Google Talk is dead, third-party support lives on

Google Talk is dead, third-party support lives on

It was a long time coming and, perhaps, some might wonder why it took so long. Mayur Kamat, Product Manager for Google Voice and Hangouts, has just announced on Google+ that starting February 23 this year, the Google Talk app for Windows will be marked as deprecated. This practically marks the end of Google Talk and its faithful users will have to migrate over to Hangouts if they want to continue the latest and greatest communications features. That said, all hope is not lost for those unwilling to jump just yet.

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Obama signs divisive cyberthreat bill amid privacy fears

Obama signs divisive cyberthreat bill amid privacy fears

President Obama publicly signed the executive order driving through new cyber security legislation today, using an appearance at Stanford to discuss the controversial balance of privacy and protection. The bill - already a topic of fierce debate in Congress, which had continually refused to pass it - demands greater information sharing between government and private industry, "sharing appropriate information" as relevant to ensure vital infrastructure isn't compromised by hackers or malicious governments. However, exactly what counts as "appropriate", and what impact that has on individual privacy, remains to be seen.

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Cyanogen looks to tech giants to fund non-Google Android plans

Cyanogen looks to tech giants to fund non-Google Android plans

It seems that startup Cyanogen won't just be stopping with Microsoft in building up support for its war against a Google-controlled Android. Rumor is spreading that Cyanogen plans to undergo a Series C funding and has been talking with the big dogs in the industry. One of those unofficially named is Amazon, who has its own custom Android flavor, which adds a bit more spice to the quest to break Google's monopoly over the largest mobile operating system, and sparking discussion on what an Android without Google would be like.

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Google Glass team needed to “reset their strategy” says CFO

Google Glass team needed to “reset their strategy” says CFO

Google's Chief Financial Officer Patrick Pichette spoke up this afternoon during the company's Q4 2014 earnings call about Glass. Briefly mentioning Glass as an example of a project that needed to "take a pause", Pichette continued by suggesting that Google sometimes does have to "take the tough calls." He didn't say the company would be closing shop on Google Glass, but he got just about as close to saying such a thing as he could without the media making the call - and they still just might.

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Google and more join pledge to protect student data

Google and more join pledge to protect student data

Both Khan Academy and Google, as well as thirteen others, have joined the growing list of companies pledging to protect students' privacy. President Obama spoke about the pledge last week, and before doing so several companies including Apple and Microsoft had signed. A total of 75 companies had signed last week, and Google and Amazon were both criticized for not doing so. On Monday, 15 new companies -- including Khan Academy and Google -- jumped aboard. This follows the administration's increased push for data security.

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It’s time to hit reset – not delete – on Google Glass

It’s time to hit reset – not delete – on Google Glass

Farewell, Explorers. Goodbye, Glass. Google's decision to spin out its controversial wearable into a standalone business was instantly portrayed by many as the often-predicted death of the headset, but the reality is less clear-cut. Glass' struggles saw early enthusiasm sour when questions around privacy and usefulness collided head-on with anti-ostentatious-geek sentiment, and the "face computer" never managed to restore its reputation. While the temptation may be to hit delete on the whole saga, I'd argue a Glass reboot with far greater focus on how head-worn wearables might fit into our daily lives would be a far more rewarding strategy.

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