Results for "google privacy"

Here’s why Intel makes perfect sense for Google Glass v2

Here’s why Intel makes perfect sense for Google Glass v2

Guess what: Google Glass isn’t dead. The news that Intel will probably be found inside the next generation of Glass wasn’t so much a surprise for its “x86 vs ARM” narrative, but that Google was not only still committed to the wearable project but actively developing it. Although unconfirmed, as the whispers would have it, Intel’s silicon will oust the aging TI cellphone processor found in the current iteration of Glass, quite the coup for a chipmaker still struggling to make a dent in mobile. The switch is about more than just running Glass’ Android fork, however: it could mean a fundamental and hugely beneficial evolution in how Glass operates and how it addresses some of the current shortcomings in battery life and dependence on the cloud.

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Next Google Glasses tipped to run on Intel chips

Next Google Glasses tipped to run on Intel chips

Google Glass might be losing some of its supporters lately but it has gained a somewhat surprising new ally. Insider sources claim that Google will be replacing the Texas Instruments processor with a still unnamed Intel mobile chip. At least, for the next iteration of Google Glass, a wearable device that has yet to see the light of day in retail. The new alliance is both fitting and rather unusual, given how the companies each have their own struggles in that specific corner of the market.

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Google should be broken up vote Euro lawmakers

Google should be broken up vote Euro lawmakers

Europe has passed a ruling calling for Google to be broken up, among other things, with politicians concerned that huge, dominant firms like the Silicon Valley giant could end up abusing their position. The vote today at the European Parliament focused on how search functionality should be unbundled from other commercial services, in an effort to reduce the potential of access being abused. While Google wasn't specifically singled out by name, the search giant is nonetheless top of the hit-list given it's responsible for around 90-percent of all queries by European web users.

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Google “right to be forgotten” tool should be global says EU

Google “right to be forgotten” tool should be global says EU

Google's "right to be forgotten" tool was grudgingly implemented in Europe back in May, but now privacy regulators are pushing to scale up the web search censoring system to cover global results, not just those localized to countries in the EU. The ruling - which affects all search engines operating in Europe, though Google is the clear leader with an estimated 90-percent market share there - allows individuals the right to request the removal of links to information "inadequate, irrelevant, or no longer relevant," and at launch saw 12,000 requests in a single day.

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Is Facebook’s privacy update welcome or whitewash?

Is Facebook’s privacy update welcome or whitewash?

Listen to Mark Zuckerberg & Co., and Facebook's privacy changes this week are not only benign but in your very best interest. A pared down explanation on data protection that's ostensibly clearer than before, as well as a guide to exactly what the privacy settings can do, were the sweetener to the side news that Facebook would actually be doing more information sharing, at least between its recent acquisitions like Instagram and WhatsApp. Problem is, we've heard those same explanations before, and they've already got at least one big company into very hot water.

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Google Street View cleavage snap leads to penalty

Google Street View cleavage snap leads to penalty

Google's Street View has caught some interesting things over the years, some of them fueling conspiracy theories, others being less fun but no less notable. Sometimes it catches things inappropriate, however, as was the case with Maria Pia Grillo of Montreal, who was sitting on her porch when the Google mobile drove by. It caught her in a picture leaning forward with elbows on knees and a fair bit of cleavage exposed. Google blurred her face but not her chest, and that led to a legal tussle.

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Google’s Skybox for Good to help nonprofits save lives

Google’s Skybox for Good to help nonprofits save lives

Satellite imaging is a rather touchy subject. So much so that it was only June this year that the US allowed the taking and use of high-quality satellite images. Aiming to give this kind mapping a more positive face, Skybox, which Google acquired just before the lifting of that satellite imaging restriction, is introducing Skybox for Good. This initiative will give nonprofit organizations such as Appalachian Voices or HALO Trust access to high-quality real-time maps of areas in order to help them save lives, human or otherwise.

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Google Glass update doesn’t play nice with Android Wear

Google Glass update doesn’t play nice with Android Wear

Google has just released updates to both its MyGlass companion app and the Google Glass XE22 firmware itself that adds the most requested feature of mirroring your phone's notifications. While it is a welcome change that makes the smart eyepiece a lot more useful for some people, it seems that the implementation hit a little snag. Aside from disabling notifications on an Android Wear smartwatch paired with the same phone, which is an explicit "feature", it apparently, hopefully accidentally, cuts off most, if not all, communication between the smartwatch and the smartphone as well.

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Tokyo court orders Google to delete crime-implying search results

Tokyo court orders Google to delete crime-implying search results

Google was ordered by the Tokyo District Court this week to delete a number of search results that a Japanese man claimed tied him to criminal activity he was not involved in. The decision comes not long after a European court ruled that internet users have the "Right to be Forgotten," forcing Google to accept requests for deleting URLs to misleading or false information from their search results.

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Google releases “Right to be Forgotten” transparency report

Google releases “Right to be Forgotten” transparency report

When Google was made to start accepting and acknowledging URL takedown requests in Europe — the famed “Right to be Forgotten” issue — they were almost immediately inundated with more than they could handle. In the first day alone, Google received over 12,000 requests from netizens, and it doesn’t look to have slowed down much. Yesterday, Google released info about those takedown requests, and the metrics are staggering. In the short time it’s been available, Google has seen over half a million takedown submissions.

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