Results for "cern higgs boson"

Higgs hunt may stop short of naming “God particle”

Higgs hunt may stop short of naming “God particle”

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider are likely to announce the most convincing evidence of the Higgs boson particle to-date at the CERN event on Wednesday, but not name it as such over an abundance of caution. Although official word isn't expected to come until tomorrow, insiders involved in the research tell Nature that "in practice you would have to be monstrously sceptical not to be convinced by what we have now" with the evidence signal likely to be confirmed at between 4.5 and 5 sigma.

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Scientists to unveil evidence of Higgs boson

Scientists to unveil evidence of Higgs boson

Remember the Large Hadron Collider and the search for the God particle? Scientists working on the project will announce on Wednesday that they have enough evidence to show that the Higgs boson does indeed exist. That doesn’t mean they’ve found it, however: the data the scientists have obtained will demonstrate the footprint of the particle, but they still haven’t discovered it for themselves.

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Higgs boson “God particle” detection possible in Chicago

Higgs boson “God particle” detection possible in Chicago

It seems strange that it's all the way over here in Chicago that the Higgs boson "God particle" may have been successfully detected when its CERN, halfway across the world, that's most famous for attempting to detect it. As it turns out though, the announcement today shows that what scientists at Fermilab, near Chicago, have found is extremely similar to what the Large Hadron Collider has already detected, making this not just an exciting discovery, but one that can be repeated in a lab. The "God particle", for those of you unaware, is one which scientists suggest will prove how particles gained mass in the original "Big Bang", this quest for its discovery quite possibly one of the most important scientific projects in our short history here on earth.

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LHC may have observed Higgs boson for the first time

LHC may have observed Higgs boson for the first time

One of the things that the Large Hadron Collider or LHC has been trying to observe has been the Higgs boson particle. There have been rumors floating around for a while now that the Higgs boson particle had been observed at the LHC and the CERN folks running the LHC are set to make an announcement tomorrow. There is no official detail on what the announcement will be, but with the rumors, the thought is the announcement will be on the Higgs boson.

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LHC is active again; proton beams online and firing

LHC is active again; proton beams online and firing

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is back in action today, firing proton beams around its 27-kilometer track. The LHC has been out of active commission for two years for upgrades, maintenance, and consolidation. The most recent delay was due to a short-circuit. Its repairs didn't take as long as originally anticipated, but were tedious because the parts in need of repair operate at temperatures near absolute zero. So, the device had to be slowly thawed and then painstakingly re-frozen before it could begin operation again.

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Stanford particle accelerator delivered smaller than grain of rice

Stanford particle accelerator delivered smaller than grain of rice

The U.S. Department of Energy, with the help of researchers at Stanford University and other public and private institutions, have demonstrated the ability of a chip no larger than a grain of rice to accelerate particles 10 times faster than a conventional particle accelerator can do alone. The chip, which is specially nano-fabricated of fused silica, has the potential to drastically scale down the machinery necessary for particle research, security scanners, medical devices and other technology. The global effect of this advance could be just as revolutionary as silicon was.

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First ever webpage restoration underway on 20th anniversary of open WWW

First ever webpage restoration underway on 20th anniversary of open WWW

CERN may be best known for its hunt for the Higgs Boson, but a team at the organization are also tracking down internet history, working to restore the first ever website to its original URL and server. The project, which will see the European Organisation for Nuclear Research restore World Wide Web founder Tim Berners-Lee's first page to info.cern.ch, requires rebuilding the site pretty much from scratch, as no screenshots of the original exist.

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SlashGear Morning Wrap-Up: July 5th, 2012

SlashGear Morning Wrap-Up: July 5th, 2012

This week we've had a fabulous holiday and are ramping up to see the barrage of updates that will pour out from tech groups across the USA in a glorious return to form. Meanwhile something undeniably important has happened - scientists working at CERN are 99.99997% (that's not just an estimate) sure that they've found the God Particle, aka Higgs boson. This discovery and nearly-proven theory has implications that will bring on a whole new era of scientific discovery, and it's happened in our lifetime! While everything else sort of pales in comparison to this news, you'll also want to see some of the more human-sized posts we've got up, including our Orange San Diego review.

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Large Hadron Collider restarts stronger than ever

Large Hadron Collider restarts stronger than ever

Scientists hunting the Higgs boson have reactivated the Large Hadron Collider, waking the slumbering proton smasher from its winter slumber, and coaxing it to faster speeds than ever before. Running in 2011 at 3.5 TeV (teraelectronvolts) in each direction - for a total collision speed of 7 TeV - the new running speed is 8 TeV, ostensibly a small step up but one which the team at CERN says will have a significant impact on the potential for discovering new particles.

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