Results for "boxee box"

Xbox TV puts Microsoft ahead of Apple and Google

Xbox TV puts Microsoft ahead of Apple and Google

Gaming has long been Microsoft's wildcard: while the company struggles to find its feet with Windows Phone, and faces a difficult tablet market when its Windows 8 slates finally appear, the Xbox 360 continues to sell strongly. Now Xbox TV has arrived to not only reassure 360-owning gamers that they made the right console choice, but broaden the 360's appeal to a whole new segment. It's not entirely fashionable to praise Microsoft, especially when it's over something that, buried in the company's history books, they've tried and failed at before. Smart TV has suffered the usual ignominies and from the usual flaws: sluggish hardware, confusing interface, dawdling internet connections. Now, with Xbox LIVE TV, all the pieces seem finally to be coming together.

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Cheap Raspberry Pi media streamer will run special XBMC software

Cheap Raspberry Pi media streamer will run special XBMC software

We have talked about the tiny little Raspberry Pi media streamer several times in the past. This is a little mainboard you can buy for about $35 that hooks your TV and allows you to stream all sorts of content to the big-screen. In case you forget, the little board has an ARM processor integrated and ships with no case. It's more like a bare-bones computer than something along the lines of the Boxee Box that is a complete finished product.

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Sony Google TV second generation hands-on

Sony Google TV second generation hands-on

Smart TVs were a running theme of CES this year, but the Google TV platform didn't get a lot of love. Aside from a chipset demonstration from Marvell and some lip service from LG, only Sony showed off real progress for the the Android-based integrated TV service. The second generation of Sony's Google TV hardware comes in integrated TV, Blu-ray and stand-alone models, and we took some time to check them out on the CES show floor.

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D-Link launches new 200Mbps PowerLine mini adapters

D-Link launches new 200Mbps PowerLine mini adapters

D-Link announced a new line of mini adapters today for its PowerLine home networking solution. These adapters plug into any home outlet and use the existing electrical wiring to extend your wireless home network signal. This helps to deliver a secure and reliable network connection to devices throughout your home or small office where it may normally be inhibited, such as by a concrete wall or by being on a different floor level.

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Can Little Companies Still Get Ahead?

Can Little Companies Still Get Ahead?

When we think about the state of home entertainment today, we typically talk about companies like Apple, Microsoft, Netflix, Sony, and others. After all, they’re the firms that are performing so well in the space right now, and they’re the companies that, at least for the time being, will continue to set the benchmark by which all others are judged.

But all that talk of big companies seems to leave out smaller firms that have some unique ideas but don’t seem to be able to get ahead.

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D-Link unveils SmartBeam and new HD Media Router

D-Link unveils SmartBeam and new HD Media Router

D-Link announced today the launch of its SmartBeam technology along with a new Wireless N HD Media Router (DIR-657). The SmartBeam feature will be debut in a new DIR-645 Wireless N Router and promises a stable and interference-free wireless connection from anywhere within your home such that you get strong and consistent wired speeds with the freedom of a wireless home network.

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Less TVs in the US, is it the Economy or the Internet?

Less TVs in the US, is it the Economy or the Internet?

I am considered an oddity among some of my friends and family because I don't have cable. I do have a TV, but I rely on DVDs, Netflix and my Roku player for my television viewing. When someone asks me if I've seen a commercial, I just smile and say "no". In fact, my daughter (at 4 years old) was shocked the first time she watched Nickelodeon when the commercials came on. She had never seen one. But maybe my odd choice is becoming less odd. A new report by Nielsen shows that for the first time since 1992, there are less US households with television sets. To be sure, the vast majority of households still own TVs, but the percentage has gone from 98.9 percent to 96.7 percent. Part of the explanation is the economy, and the change to digital. But is there another explanation?

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