Search Results for: bone conduction

Google Glass bone conduction earpiece tipped for private audio

Google Glass bone conduction earpiece tipped for private audio

Google has used bone conduction for its Project Glass wearable computer, it's claimed, promising discrete notifications that only the wearer themselves can hear. The headset makes contact with the mastoid process, linked directly to the middle ear, insiders tell Geek, meaning any audio output - such as new messages, Google+ alerts, or other notifications - is piped in directly, completely inaudible to those around the Glass owner, and yet can still be perceived despite high background noise.

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Vibe Body Sound bone conduction headphones

Vibe Body Sound bone conduction headphones

I don’t get the big deal over headphones, earbuds or what-have-you. I’m not a music connoisseur or anything so sound quality is not as important to me as comfort and getting to listen to my music. I also don’t get the people dying because they don’t turn their music down while walking down busy roads or train tracks. The Vibe Body Sound headphones appear to be comfortable and will reduce death.

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Sound Leaf+ bone conduction Bluetooth headset from NTT DoCoMo

Sound Leaf+ bone conduction Bluetooth headset from NTT DoCoMo

This is pretty much as good as it gets for being able to hear your Bluetooth headset. The only issue I can see, is that if you are in a noisy enough environment where you need bone conduction to hear, then there is no way that the person you are talking to will be able to hear or understand what you are saying.

It does have dual mic’s, one directional, one not, which should help with that problem though. And even if it doesn’t, the headset is supposedly still good for those with hearing disabilities as bone conduction works a little differently than sound waves.

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Pantech add bone conduction to silent cellphone

Pantech add bone conduction to silent cellphone

Bone conduction.  No, not some heinous experiment involving a hot-plate and the contents of your Dad's underpants, it's a way of squirrelling sound into your ears by directly vibrating your skull.  The key benefits are that you can still hear despite ambient noise - that means you don't have to turn the volume up - and it's far more private as eavesdroppers would have to press their faces against yours to hear it.  And you'd probably notice them doing that.  We've seen it before on Bluetooth headsets and mp3 players, but Pantech are perhaps the first to put it directly into a cellphone with their A1407PT.

 

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Bone Conduction gets art application

Bone Conduction gets art application

Historically museums could be confusing, distant places; if you didn't have knowledge of what you were looking it, or were unable to decipher the oddly-phrased explanation cards, then you could spend much of your time walking round indecently puzzled about everything.  That all changed with the introduction of wireless audio guides, giving people a personal tour of exhibitions with all the supplementary information and explanations they could need.  Of course, what's suited for inside a weather-proof, contained gallery is less ideal for an outdoor attraction; that's where artist Markus Kison comes in.

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CTIA 2007: Test-driving the Sound Leaf Bone Conduction Receiver Microphone

CTIA 2007: Test-driving the Sound Leaf Bone Conduction Receiver Microphone

Base on my expressions from the video below, you’ll just have to take my word that the Sound Leaf totally kicks ass.

The Sound Leaf “Bone Conduction Receiver Microphone” is a great add-on to your existing handset for speaking in loud places, and for people suffering from age-related hearing loss.

It plugs into FOMA phones with flat earphone microphone jacks, and conducts sound vibrations to the auditory nerves through the cranial bones. This is also the first product in the industry that combines a bone-conduction function with a telephone coil (T-Coil) allowing people using hearing aids (with T-Coil) to make clear calls.

Google Glass bone-conduction increasingly possible with indirect audio patent

Google Glass bone-conduction increasingly possible with indirect audio patent

Signs that Google is using bone-conduction for private audio from its Project Glass headset continue to mount, with a new patent application from the company describing exactly how the surreptitious system might work. The patent filing, a "Wearable computing device with indirect bone-conduction speaker" uses the same basic Google Glass diagrams as we've seen in other recent wearables patents, but this time details "at least one vibration transducer" the movements of which are passed through the headset and into the wearer's bone structure.

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Sanwa 400-HS015 bone-conduction Bluetooth sunglasses

Sanwa 400-HS015 bone-conduction Bluetooth sunglasses

Our experiences with bone conduction have been mixed; we didn't have fantastic results with Motorola's Endeavor HX1 Bluetooth headset but a brief play with music-centric headphones have been more impressive.  So we're holding judgement on the Sanwa 400-HS015 Bluetooth sunglasses until we read a review: they hook up to your cellphone, PMP or notebook and stream stereo audio via the Bluetooth A2DP profile, but use bone-conduction rather than traditional in-ear buds.

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