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Berg’s odd Little Printer hits preorder

Berg’s odd Little Printer hits preorder

Last November I talked a bit about an odd little printer called the Little Printer. The idea behind the Little Printer was that you could enter subscriptions for your social networking sites such as Twitter that you enjoy reading in the mornings, and the printer would print them on real paper for you to read. It's an oddly not green gadget.

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Little Printer prints digital stuff for you to read

Little Printer prints digital stuff for you to read

The Little Printer is a strange item that seems to be aimed a the person who both likes and loathes digital media. This Little Printer allows you to enter your subscriptions for social networking sites and other places and then each morning it will print that content out for you. Granted that isn’t green, but if you want a printed page to take with you this might be the ticket.

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The Auto Vivisectionist: Inside GM’s Secret Teardown Lab

The Auto Vivisectionist: Inside GM’s Secret Teardown Lab

It's the killing ground where hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of SUVs, sports cars, and sedans meet their grisly end before they have more than a handful of miles on the clock. Some of General Motor's earliest work on building new models comes as much from tearing apart cars as it does piecing together fresh parts. That's the odd double approach of the Competitive Teardown Area, the high-security garage where cutting edge 3D printing and rapid prototyping sits alongside socket sets and angle grinders. The luckier cars start as homegrown constituent parts and leave as near-complete mockups of tomorrow's models; the unlucky ones - often wearing badges from Ford, Mercedes, Honda, Toyota, and other GM rivals - are making their final journey in one piece when they roll in through gates. It's the sort of place where, ordinarily, you'd need to be part of GM's engineering inner-circle to walk around, but SlashGear was invited to pay a special visit.

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3D printing may explode at rate incomparable to its 2D predecessor

3D printing may explode at rate incomparable to its 2D predecessor

If 3D printing advances as fast as 2D printing advanced, we'll be working with our own Replicators from Star Trek by the year 2080. It took just 40 years for the original printing press to turn over from the single Gutenberg press to get to a mass production scale across Europe, and much, much less time for computers to advance from massive machines to teeny-tiny chips. With advances like home-bound do it yourself printers and the fact that pirate sites across the web are now sharing model files so that you might print your own objects at home without effort, we've not got much time at all before advances are made to the tune of Earl Gray, Hot.

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