Results for "Smithsonian"

Lake Michigan’s oddly clear water reveals old shipwrecks

Lake Michigan’s oddly clear water reveals old shipwrecks

Those of us around the Great Lakes were hit with a bitter cold winter this year, but it has turned out to have a beautiful effect on Lake Michigan in particular. The lake’s water has turned oddly clear in the transitioning period between having an icy shell and being muddied up with algae blooms and sediment, and with that clarity comes shipwrecks. Many shipwrecks. Images of old shipwrecks being spotted in the crystal clear water have surfaced via the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station in Traverse City, and they lend a fascinating look at what lies below the typically dark water.

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New ‘Chilesaurus’ therapod was an adorable vegetarian

New ‘Chilesaurus’ therapod was an adorable vegetarian

Researchers have added a new Jurassic dinosaur to the roster of known dinosaurs, and it was discovered back in 2004 by a 7-year-old boy. The boy and his parents were on a hike in Southern Chile when the boy — Diego Suarez — found a couple bones, which his parents identified as belonging to a dinosaur. It has been a long while since then, but a lot of progress has been made and that dinosaur now has a name: Chilesaurus diegosuarezi. The most interesting discovery is that despite being a theropod, the dinosaur preferred to eat plants rather than other animals.

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A distant sea of proto-life molecules could mean we’re not alone

A distant sea of proto-life molecules could mean we’re not alone

The building blocks of life have been observed for the first time in a fledgling planetary system light-years away from Earth, a thriving sea of complex organic molecules equal to our own oceans. The discovery, which lends further weight to the idea that our solar system is not the only place where life could have arisen in the universe, was made by astronomers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Perhaps even more impressive than their very existence is the fact that the proportions of molecules are similar to those discovered in comets in our own region of space.

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Brontosaurus is back from the dead (in name at least)

Brontosaurus is back from the dead (in name at least)

Back when you were a kid and you were first learning about dinosaurs - almost no matter what age you are today - you probably learned about a dinosaur named Brontosaurus. As one of the first dinosaurs to be reconstructed with fossil fragments and shown to the public as a quintessential "thunder lizard," Brontosaurus remained a popular name for a certain kind of long dinosaur for many years after it was formally retired. In 1903, paleontologist Elmer Riggs suggested that traits that separated the Brontosaurus and the Apatosaurus suggested that the former was just a shorter or younger version of the latter. This week that changes.

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Museums tell visitors to leave their selfie sticks behind

Museums tell visitors to leave their selfie sticks behind

Selfie sticks are easy to mock and are an excellent way to embarrass your friends. To be fair, they're also a decent way to get a snapshot of yourself and your significant other in front of something without asking a stranger to handle your phone. That use is proving to be a problem in some museums, however, and now the banhammers are coming: a couple museums in New York have banned the use of selfie sticks on their premises, and they're not the only ones. The reason is due to safety.

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Neil Armstrong’s moon landing white bag contents explored

Neil Armstrong’s moon landing white bag contents explored

This month the estate of Neil Armstrong has revealed a white bag of items used by the Astronaut aboard Apollo 11 on his mission to the Moon. These items were collected by Armstrong at the end of his mission and have remained relatively dormant for decades - sitting amongst his personal belongings in his home. This year the Neil Armstrong Estate begins their loan of these items to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC, where they'll be explored, researched, and eventually displayed for all to see.

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Scientists “upload” a roundworm brain to a LEGO robot

Scientists “upload” a roundworm brain to a LEGO robot

It sounds like a scene from a sci-fi flick. Or a horror film. Take your pick. Scientists of the future have finally found a way to digitize our brains and store them in storage disks (or Dilithium crystals for more capacity). One day you're human and the next day you find yourself in the body of an android. OK, this experiment might not exactly be that sensational, unless you happen to be a roundworm whose suddenly finds itself with the body of a LEGO robot.

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Godzilla 2014 vs US Air Force: real talk

Godzilla 2014 vs US Air Force: real talk

Godzilla is nearly at our doorstep. In less than a week, Godzilla’s 2014 big-screen movie will be bringing mayhem to the world. Understandably, the folks at Air & Space with the Smithsonian decided it’d make far more sense to speak about the film with the United States Air Force than the filmmakers - not about the film, but about Godzilla himself.

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Big Bang breakthrough as Cosmic contractions spotted

Big Bang breakthrough as Cosmic contractions spotted

A "spectacular" discovery that could explain the Big Bang that created the universe and potentially lead to Nobel prizes for the researchers behind it is prompting excitement in the scientific community, concerning the sudden "inflation" rush in growth in the very first moments of cosmic expansion. Inflation as a theory concerns the initial growth of the universe - measured as a trillionth of a trillionth of a trillionth of a second - fourteen billion years ago, and an American team now says it has identified the lingering remnants of it.

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