Results for ""internet of things""

Wolfram Language wants to revolutionize coding

Wolfram Language wants to revolutionize coding

Wolfram Alpha has spawned a new symbolic programming language, Wolfram Language, with Stephen Wolfram revealing what he promises is the "most productive" way to create code. As with Wolfram Alpha search, which uses contextual awareness to answer questions, Wolfram Language is a "knowledge-based language", its inventor claims, giving the language itself continually-curated awareness of the world it exists in and how things like interfaces are structured, allowing even those with no prior programming experience the opportunity to build complex apps.

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Kopin Pupil hands-on: Glass tech without geek looks

Kopin Pupil hands-on: Glass tech without geek looks

Kopin has revealed its latest wearable system, Pupil, a combination of a micro-display and voice control noise-cancellation system the company hopes will eventually be used in head-worn tech like Google's Glass. A reference design intending to show how wearable computing could be integrated into a design that's more palatable to the consumer market, Pupil isn't intended for the market in its current form, but is instead intended to showcase the fruits of Kopin's new partnership with Olympus in display technology. We caught up with Kopin to find out more.

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AT&T and IBM team on Smart Cities with see-everything IoT tech

AT&T and IBM team on Smart Cities with see-everything IoT tech

AT&T and IBM are teaming up for the Internet of Things (IoT) on a huge scale, planning to outfit smart cities with cameras, roads, utility meters, and more that can all intercommunicate as residents and cars move around them. The "global alliance" will see AT&T and IBM first look at gathering and crunching Big Data from cities and utilities, potentially integrating news of traffic jams, parking lot congestion, where police and other emergency services are located, and even social media reports from those living or working in the city to dynamically shape urban planning.

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Smart object-recognition system could spy on your milk in the IoT

Smart object-recognition system could spy on your milk in the IoT

Computers that can identify objects without requiring any human training are now a possibility, as researchers figure out how to teach AIs to intuit the key features and differences between faces, objects, and more. The new algorithm, developed by engineer Dah-Jye Lee of Brigham Young University, avoids human calibration by instead giving computers the skills to learn how to differentiate themselves: so, rather than the operator flagging individual differences between, say, a person and a tree, the computer is given the tools to identify the differences on its own, and then use them moving forward.

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Motorola talks Android, Wearables & Nest: The SlashGear Interview

Motorola talks Android, Wearables & Nest: The SlashGear Interview

It's fair to say Motorola had a big 2013, and SlashGear sat down with Steve Horowitz, senior VP of software engineering, and Steve Sinclair, VP of product marketing, at CES last week to talk wearables, contextual ecosystems, and the Internet of Things. The Google-owned company kicked off a new smartphone strategy, epitomized by the always-listening Moto X and the shockingly-affordable Moto G, arguably just as notable for what it left out of its products as what it chose to include. Meanwhile - and topical, given Google has just acquired Nest - we also talked about Motorola's place in the smart home, and where former Android project lead Horowitz sees the smartphone fitting in. Read on for the full interview.

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Linux-based Internet-connected devices widely vulnerable to new worm

Linux-based Internet-connected devices widely vulnerable to new worm

Symantec researcher Kaoru Hayashi has posted a report to the effect that a sizable portion of the "Internet of Things" is now vulnerable to a worm called Linux.Darlloz. The worm attacks CPUs running on devices like routers, set-top boxes, security cameras and industrial control systems, as well as PCs. The worm relies on a pre-May 2012 vulnerability still present in many devices running Linux.

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Revolv Hub Review

Revolv Hub Review

If the kitchen is the heart of the home, then "node zero" is the heart of the smart home, but in today's plug-and-play world of lifestyle automation that doesn't have to mean a cabinet full of rack-mounted hardware and professional installation. Startup Revolv aims to be the hub of the new generation, a central point at which automation favorites like Sonos, Philips' hue, and more can gather for more intelligent control. With no single leader in the smart home space, however, and numerous competing wireless standards in play, that's a lot to ask from the teardrop-shaped gadget: so, is it home sweet home or fit only for the mad-house? Read on for the SlashGear review.

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Apple patent automates your life via locations, devices, tasks

Apple patent automates your life via locations, devices, tasks

Apple has patented a home automation technology that can turn your lights on when you enter your home, fire up your home entertainment system when you're on your way, adjust HVAC settings depending on your activities in remote locations, and untold other applications, Apple Insider has revealed. The system would combine geo-fencing with activity detection, so that not only your location but also your specific activities inform the automated tasks. The patent was awarded today.

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