Results for "microsoft"

Video: ‘Project Astoria’, Microsoft’s Android app porting tool, at work

Video: ‘Project Astoria’, Microsoft’s Android app porting tool, at work

Microsoft’s Project Astoria, their system for taking existing Android app code and running it inside windows, is both exciting and troubling. On one hand, it satisfies the ‘write once deploy everywhere’ strategy that makes a Developer’s life easier. On the other hand, these apps aren’t really native for the platform, which has us wondering about things like performance. Also, how easy is it for Developers to move an app over? Now we know; Microsoft has created a simple video outlining Project Astoria’s strengths, and I have to say — I’m intrigued.

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Windows 8: what Microsoft did right and what went wrong

Windows 8: what Microsoft did right and what went wrong

Windows 10 is coming really soon. If AMD is to be believed, that is happening around July. Given this upcoming version of Windows is set to fix a number of complaints about Windows 8, it's release will surely call to mind some its predecessor's shortcomings. But for all the warts that Windows 8 had, it wasn't completely a failure in all aspects and even laid the foundations of many features and mindsets still present in Windows 10 and elsewhere. Here we take a look at 5 of the things Windows 8 could have gotten right and also how they failed to reach the mark.

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Microsoft’s iOS, Android app porting tools now open

Microsoft’s iOS, Android app porting tools now open

Developers can now start porting their Android and iOS apps to Windows, if they dare. Yesterday, Microsoft announced a suspiciously easy tool that allows Developers to port their iOS and Android apps to the Windows platform. On stage, Microsoft demoed an Android app running on a Windows Phone like it was made for the platform. Now, Project Islandwood (iOS) and Project Astoria (Android) are open for business. They are, of course, in a “limited preview”, so don’t expect too much just yet.

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Microsoft’s ‘How Old’ age estimator reaps Internet mockery

Microsoft’s ‘How Old’ age estimator reaps Internet mockery

Microsoft has a facial recognition tool called 'How Old' that aims to guess your age based on a picture of your face. It's a fun little novelty...or it would be if it were accurate. Rather, many users find the guesses to be inaccurate, sometimes very much so, and as a result the Internet has done what the Internet often does: taken to mockery. A bunch of screenshots have appeared on Twitter (and elsewhere) showing faces and the ages estimated, and in some cases faces that aren't even human.

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Microsoft woos makers: Windows 10 for RPi 2, Arduino

Microsoft woos makers: Windows 10 for RPi 2, Arduino

Following up on what it started last February, Microsoft is pushing through with the thrust to bring Windows 10 to even smaller and less powerful but more general purpose hardware. In short, it is targeting the development and hobby boards that hackers and makers have grown to love. As part of its attempt to remain relevant in the Internet of Things (IoT), it is starting an Insider Preview of what it calls Windows 10 IoT Core. Plus, it has just made sure that at least one edition of the OS is now labeled as "Arduino-certified".

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Microsoft BUILD 2015 Day 1 Wrap-up: Windows 10 cross-device functionality

Microsoft BUILD 2015 Day 1 Wrap-up: Windows 10 cross-device functionality

This morning Microsoft revealed a new hand of cards at BUILD 2015, a set of announcements that place Windows 10 squarely at the center of their play for all screens. All screens, that is to say, and all connections between screens. One major example of this connectivity is in Continuum, a system that allows your Windows 10 operating system to convert its user interface for all manner of different devices. Your phone is now your desktop, and your display is now just that - the place where your Windows 10 is shown in a large space.

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Microsoft HoloLens hardware: No Connections Required

Microsoft HoloLens hardware: No Connections Required

This week at BUILD 2015, Microsoft is running down what may very well be the final hardware for their holographic headset, Microsoft HoloLens. This device, they reiterate and assure us, needs no wires, no external cameras, no smartphones, and no connectivity to a PC. "People used to say computers today can do enough," said Microsoft's Alex Kipman, "[but] what are we going to do with all this extra computing power? We are going to start using this power specifically to help us understand humans and the world around us."

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Microsoft shows how augmented, real spaces interact with cute robot

Microsoft shows how augmented, real spaces interact with cute robot

Microsoft’s Hololens is an interesting take on augmented reality, and now comes with robotic friends. At Build 2015, Microsoft announced B15, a robot that was also a holographic representation of something more. With core hardware meant for navigating, Microsoft showed how Hololens could be used to navigate B15 around a room, and be used to complete tasks. It’s also a learning machine, based on Hololens technology, and can reroute itself based on obstacles that may come up, and is always controllable by you.

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