Nintendo 3DS Could Cause Headaches With Long Periods of Play

Jun 18, 2010
1
Nintendo 3DS Could Cause Headaches With Long Periods of Play

3D may be rising out of the ashes of its former glory like the legendary Phoenix, but so far its primary focus has been in the movie theaters around the world. At the most, you're subject to those fake fields of depth for two and a half hours, and then you're back to the "real" 3D world, no worse for wear. But, when you start playing video games, you're probably going to be playing for a bit longer. With that in mind, Nintendo is currently working with specialists in the field to make sure their upcoming 3D handheld gaming platform is safe for everyone to use. Right now? Nintendo is suggesting that young gamers should take it easy.

"We are working with the experts in the field," he said. "We've done extensive testing. We have a legacy of bringing only the best and finest products to the marketplace."

That line was in comment to the suggestion that playing the 3DS for a long period of time could cause headaches, or any other number of discomforts. Furthermore, while the warning isn't necessarily in place for "older" people, Reggie Fils-Aime --Nintendo of America's President-- did say that children should not play the 3DS in its actual 3D mode. Why? Because kids' eye muscles are not fully developed yet, and therefore can be put under strain faster, and therefore be damaged faster.

So, according to Fils-Aime, what's the cut-off range for children? At around age 7, he suggests, kids should be able to play the 3DS to its full potential. There is a slider on the side of the 3DS that allows for customization of the intensity of the 3D image. Also, you can shut off the 3D image with that same slider, preventing the player from witnessing any 3D at all. We're glad that Nintendo's looking into the technology, and making sure that people are aware of the risks that the technology inherently projects. We're also glad for that slider. Either way, we're sure the 3DS is going to a success, even for kids around the age of 7.

[via Kotaku]


Must Read Bits & Bytes