Netflix Shifting To Multiple Simultaneous Streaming And More Personalized Accounts?

Apr 19, 2011
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Netflix may be offering family plans with the option for multiple simultaneous streams later this year. A message lifted from Netflix's investor relations FAQ page this morning seems to support speculation that the company is heading towards a more full on streaming model. They are looking into various service options to offer including one that encourages multiple accounts in one household.

Currently, Netflix offers a $7.99 streaming-only service that gives you one stream at a time or a one-DVD plan that offers unlimited streaming but doesn't allow for multiple simultaneous streaming. However, they do offer multiple simultaneous streaming of up to four at a time with a four-DVD monthly plan.

Their new offering later this year may be to simplify things and focus on pushing households to sign up for either additional streams or multiple accounts under one umbrella family plan.

The Investors FAQ message reads:

The evolution toward individual memberships will take time, and we are still thinking about how to best do it. One option would be to allow an account to add additional concurrent streams (using the analogy of our DVD business, it would be like choosing a higher-priced plan that allows a subscriber to have more DVDs at home). Our $7.99-per-month plan is for one stream at a time, and later this year we expect to be able to offer consumers some account options to watch multiple simultaneous streams. Or it could be that there is a price point that would encourage multiple accounts in one household.

Netflix may also be looking beyond the household, hoping to boost individual memberships in the future as well. Individual plans could involve streaming content to mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets along with having more social integration with Facebook. This may all be in the horizon for the company as they aim to ramp up their service with improved recommendations for a more personalized experience.

[via VentureBeat]


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