LulzSec hackers sentenced in London court

May 16, 2013
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LulzSec hackers sentenced in London court

In April, LulzSec members Ryan Ackroyd, Jake Davis, and Mustafa al-Bassam plead guilty to various charges in London for their roles in cyberattacks against Sony, the NHS, News International, and more. Today the three of them - plus Ryan Cleary - were sentenced in the same court, with all but one getting prison sentences. This follows other members who have already been sentenced, including Cody Kretsinger, who was known as Recursion.

Last month, 20-year-old Jake Davis, 26-year-old Ryan Ackroyd, and 18-year-old Mustafa al-Bassam plead guilty to charges of cyberattacking the NHS, News International, and Sony. On top of those, Ackroyd in particular also plead guilty to plotting attacks on other websites in addition to a computer hacking charge. Al-Bassam and Davis, in addition to the aforementioned, plead guilty to conspiring to attack various law enforcement agencies in both the US and UK.

While those three plead guilty last month, 21-year-old Ryan Cleary, who was also sentenced today, had already plead guilty in his own legal spat, which consisted of six various related charges. The guilty pleas were entered about two years after the attacks for which they were sentenced took place. Out of the four, Ackroyd had been the only to initially maintain his innocence.

Now that the sentencing is complete, we see that Cleary was given a 32-month prison sentence, Ackroyd a 30-month sentence, and Davis a 24-month sentence. Al-Bassam was the only one to side-step a prison sentence, instead receiving a 20-month suspended sentence because - though now an adult - he was only 16-years-old when he committed the cyberattacks, making him a minor. Instead, he will perform 300 hours of community service.

Crown Prosecution Service lawyer Andrew Hadik said: "The harm they caused was foreseeable, extensive and intended. Indeed, they boasted of how clever they were with a complete disregard for the impact their actions had on real people's lives. This case should serve as a warning to other cybercriminals that they are not invincible."

SOURCE: BBC News


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