iPhone 6 Retina display testing tips eye-melting improvements

May 14, 2014
10
iPhone 6 Retina display testing tips eye-melting improvements

The iPhone 6 could introduce a 3X mode with pixel-tripling, insiders claim, with the new flagship iOS smartphone tipped to have a 1704 x 960 display. While many leaks have pointed to at least one larger iPhone 6 for launch later in the year, the resolution that the device will run at has been an ongoing mystery, particularly given any significant change could leave developers scrambling to recreate their apps to look good on the bigger handset.

According to 9to5Mac's sources, however, Apple's approach will be an interesting one. Basing calculations from a so-called "base resolution" of 568 x 320 - on the current iPhone range - and then taking into account pixel-doubling on the Retina display, they suggest a so-called 3X mode with pixel-tripling.

In fact, Apple is said to be testing a 1704 x 960 panel for the iPhone 6, with the same 16:9 aspect ratio as the current devices, but taller and wider.

Such a resolution, even spread across the 4.7- and 5.5-inch displays rumored for the two versions of the iPhone 6, would keep within Apple's own guidelines for what constitutes "Retina" class imaging. In fact, it would best any previous iPhone, with 416ppi and 356ppi respectively.

iOS 8, meanwhile, is said to be expected to simply scale up most of the key interface elements, so that they're larger on the new phone. However, some degree of optimization - both from Apple itself and offered for third-party developers - is also likely, to better use the extra real-estate on offer.

That could include shifting the position of on-screen game controls depending on what size iPhone players are using.

Apple's tests more than likely cover a number of panel options, and the company could well settle on a different screen approach than this one, the site points out. Other hardware features are believed to include voice-over-LTE support with new LTE chips, and the updated Apple A8 chipset.

SOURCE 9to5Mac


Must Read Bits & Bytes