Google Buzz’s last gasp: Drive swallows final bits of lost social network

May 27, 2013
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Google Buzz’s last gasp: Drive swallows final bits of lost social network

Google Buzz was shut down back in 2011, but Google seems to still be dealing with the service like an annoying dog that won't go away. Google has notified its users via email that all your Buzz data will be moved to a folder in your Google Drive account. The migration will begin starting July 17, where users will begin seeing their Buzz data appear in Google Drive.

The transfer will result in two sets of files showing up in Google Drive, the first of which will contain a snapshot of the public and private Buzz posts that you have made. This will be a private Drive folder, while the second set of files will be public by default, consisting of all your public Buzz posts that can be viewable by anyone with the files' links.

As for comments, those will also be migrated to Google Drive, but they will be saved to the user's Drive whose post the comments appeared on, not the commenter. This could create a little friction, as commenters won't have any control over who sees the migrated data of a post that has a comment of theirs in it, so Google recommends that you delete your Buzz content now before the migration happens.

Google also says that all Buzz files will be treated "the same as any other Drive file," so you'll be able to do whatever you want with them just like you could with regular Drive files. These added Buzz files won't count against your storage limit, but you should be able to easily delete them if you don't have a need for them.

Google Buzz originally launched back in February 2010, and while it was given the benefit of the doubt by early adopters, it eventually didn't stand the test of time. No one used it, and it didn't offer anything that Facebook and Twitter didn't already offer. Google shut down Buzz in 2011 to no one's chagrin, but eventually launched another social network called Google+, which is the company's current social offering that seems to be doing fairly well amongst a niche audience.

VIA: The Next Web


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