Archive for Jul 27, 2010

Apple Battery Charger claims lowest “vampire draw”

Apple Battery Charger claims lowest “vampire draw”

Looks like we spoke too soon when we said the new 27-inch LED Cinema Display was Apple's last new product of the morning; they've also slipped out a new Apple Battery Charger, intended for use with battery-powered peripherals like the Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad.  The Cupertino company reckons their new charger is "optimized" for their own batteries, though of course it'll rejuice any AA-sized NiMH cells you slot in.

In the box is the charger itself and six batteries, with Apple claiming up to a 10-year lifespan for them.  Also making the whole thing a little more earth-friendly is the fact that it apparently has the lowest "vampire draw" (or standby power consumption) of "any similar charger on the market": just 30 milliwatts, in fact.

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Mac Pro gets dual-hexacore Intel Xeon upgrade

Mac Pro gets dual-hexacore Intel Xeon upgrade

It's not just new iMacs that Apple have outed this morning; the company has also announced updates to its Mac Pro range with the much-anticipated quad- and hexacore Intel Xeon processors.  While the basic configurations include quad-core CPUs as standard, up to two 2.93GHz 6-core Intel Xeon X5670 processors can be specified, along with up to four 512GB SSDs, an ATI Radeon HD 5870 with 1GB of memory, and up to 32GB of DDR3 memory.  Meanwhile there are now two Mini DisplayPort ports as standard.

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iMac gets Core i3, i5 & i7 update, new Apple Magic Trackpad

iMac gets Core i3, i5 & i7 update, new Apple Magic Trackpad

As expected, Apple has updated its iMac line to include Intel's Core i3, Core i5, and Core i7 processors, and they've also outed their Magic Trackpad too.  As before there are 21.5- and 27-inch versions of the iMac, now kicking off from $1,199 with a 3.06 GHz Intel Core i3 processor, 4GB of DDR3 memory and ATI Radeon HD 4670 graphics; $1,699 gets you a 27-inch 3.20 GHz Intel Core i3 machine with ATI Radeon HD 5670 graphics.

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