CubeSensors ships out to give a more accurate weather readout of your room

Jan 10, 2014
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Weather apps are a dime a dozen on both Android and iOS but the information they give out is mostly useful for those outside. When you want to know about the conditions of your home or your room, you're mostly out of luck, at least until now. Meet CubeSensor, a small weather sensor that can conveniently sit on top of your hand or, better yet, on your desk.

Each Cube packs a load of sensors that you'd usually find in separate or more expensive tools. These include sensors for temperature, humidity, air quality, air pressure, light, and even noise. All of these crammed into a stylish white box that you can conveniently place anywhere in your home or office, be it a desk, bookshelf, or even a kitchen table, without looking like you're carrying some complicated weather instrument.

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But why would you want to gather these data indoors? The purpose is to provide users with the right pieces of information to judge the quality of their environment and adjust it as needed. It can check, for example, if the level of lighting is good enough for working without straining your eyes. It can help users determine if their physical ailments, like a headache, can be caused by certain environmental factors, like air pressure. It can also measure the amount of noise that could be keeping you from focusing.

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CubeSensors is quite easy to use. It has no buttons or displays. Simply shake the cube to make it glow and check the room it's in. The glow will also relay the condition of the room, blue for healthy and red for warning. CubeSensors also has a web app that will let users check on the readout remotely. It even gives some advice on what to do.

CubeSensors come in packs of 2, 4, and 6 cubes priced at $299, $449, and $599, respectively. The company says that the first batch of pre-orders have sold out in just a month and they are now accepting new orders that will ship in spring this year.

SOURCE: CubeSensors


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