Author Archives: Will Conley

Humanesque technology writer for SlashGear and beyond.

US telecoms sold 1.1 million cell records to law enforcement in 2012

US telecoms sold 1.1 million cell records to law enforcement in 2012

The major US telecoms delivered at minimum 1.1 million cell phone records to law enforcement at all levels of government in 2012. The records include voicemail and text content. The telecoms earned $26 million from the transactions. Many of the fulfilled information requests legally required no warrant, no subpoena, and no probable cause. These and other irresistible revelations come compliments of US Sen. Edward Markey, whose voluminous correspondence with the involved telecoms revealed the information. They include US Cellular, Sprint Nextel, T-Mobile USA, Leap Wireless/Cricket Communications, MetroPCS, Verizon, AT&T and C Spire Wireless.

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Hackers stole data from five European nations at September G20 Summit

Hackers stole data from five European nations at September G20 Summit

Network security company FireEye has reported a coordinated malware attack on five European foreign ministries. The attack took place last August just prior to the G20 Summit in September. It was achieved by sending the ministries email attachments bearing file names pertaining to the primary topic of the summit: military options in Syria. Once downloaded, the files allowed the hackers to monitor communications and steal data from the host machines. FireEye believes the hackers are from China, but it stopped short of alleging collusion with the Chinese government.

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Samsung to launch 1TB mSATA SSD this month

Samsung to launch 1TB mSATA SSD this month

Samsung this evening announced it will launch the industry's first 1-terabyte (1TB) mSATA SSD this month. That doubles the capacity (512GB) of some of the largest-capacity mSATA SSDs generally available today. As such, the 1TB 840 EVO mSATA SSD is poised to bring unprecedented large-capacity hard storage to some of the market's thinnest portables.

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Scientists trace superconductivity anomalies to a single point

Scientists trace superconductivity anomalies to a single point

Superconducting materials that function at room temperature make electrons behave unpredictably. The electrons sometimes arrange themselves in lines or around atoms in an asymmetrical arrangement. This is one reason superconductors have not proliferated into everyday use -- an advance that would render everything from power lines to personal computers far, far more efficient. But two scientists now say they have discovered the cause of those anomalies in zero-resistance systems and are now working on a practical way to get rid of them.

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