Author Archives: Michael Gartenberg

Michael Gartenberg is a partner at Altimeter Group. His weblog can be found at gartenblog.net. Contact him at Gartenberg AT gmail DOT com Views expressed here are his own.

Froyo is delicious: Hands on with Android 2.2

Froyo is delicious: Hands on with Android 2.2

Last week Google formally announced the newest version of the Android family. Known as Froyo (or Frozen Yogurt; Android releases are all named after desserts and I can't wait to see what they do with the letter X) or more properly Android 2.2, it offers a number of enhancements and fixes to the Android platform. I've been testing Froyo on a Nexus One (currently the only device supported by 2.2) and here's what's in there, good and bad.

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Two weeks of travel, Ten iPad lessons

Two weeks of travel, Ten iPad lessons

A while back, I tried traveling on business with nothing but the help of three smart phones. I quickly ran into the headroom of those devices and, by the time I was home, I had a huge list of tasks I needed to deal with that could only be done on a computer. I wondered how I would have fared had I carried an iPad with me instead. So over the last two weeks, I've done just that, carried an iPad on my travels and left the laptop at home. Here are ten lessons of the iPad I learned from two weeks on the road with it.

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First Hands on with KIN One and Two – Where Mobile and Social Networks Collide

First Hands on with KIN One and Two – Where Mobile and Social Networks Collide

The KIN embargo is now lifted and I can now talk about the devices experience as well as pricing. Here's some initial thoughts.

Device pricing - The KIN One is $49 and the KIN Two is $99. That price includes a $100 rebate. That's pretty reasonable and in line with most high end feature or low end "smart" devices. The truth is KIN is neither of those things, although I expect a lot of folks to compare it to one, the other or both. The reality is the KIN is really a cloud phone. Its value is derived from cloud services, as well as the KIN Studio on the web. There's a lot that's different about these devices and a good deal of what Microsoft does here will be dependent on how well they can message this to their target demographic.

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Why I like Kin

Why I like Kin

Recently, Microsoft unveiled a new mobile platform and two new devices built for it. It's called Kin and it's targeted at a younger demographic with a focus on social communication. It's also been one of the most controversial releases I've ever seen. Many folks who've weighed in on the topic weren't too impressed. They cite a lack of features ranging from a calendar to no support for third party applications, most notably games. I don't share those views (although I do think it's not a good idea for middle aged Microsoft executives to go with a shirt untucked and unshaven look while presenting) and I think Kin has a good chance of being successful in the marketplace. Here's why.

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The Droid Incredible is, well, Incredible

The Droid Incredible is, well, Incredible

At the beginning of the year, Google called a group of reporters and analysts to Google HQ to announce a new phone, the Nexus One. A joint effort of HTC and Google, the N1 was a slim device, running a speedy Snapdragon processor and an AMOLED display. Running the latest version of Android, 2.1, it was state of the art, at least for January.

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iPhone OS 4.0 in the year that changed everything

iPhone OS 4.0 in the year that changed everything

We've barely put the first quarter of the year behind us and it's already shaping up to be one that will be noted as an inflection point going forward. We're going to remember 2010 as the year that changed everything. I've talked in the past about the velocity of mobile and the rate and pace of innovation; now we've seen the next step in that process with Apple's news of iPhone OS 4.0.

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Is Moore’s Law Still Relevant for PCs?

Is Moore’s Law Still Relevant for PCs?

It's been more than thirty five years since Gordon Moore, the co-founder of Intel, observed that the transistor density of semiconductor chips doubles roughly every 18 months. This observation was both accurate as well as profound and became known to us as Moore’s Law. The effect of Moore's Law has been simple, new PCs are almost twice as powerful as the prior generation. This in turn led to mass market adoption as PCs became more powerful, capability and functionality increased and appeal widened the market for new adopters with every generation of hardware and the software functionality it enabled. It appears Moore’s Law remains in force and by most accounts will continue for at least some time. But I often wonder whether there is still benefit for most users and in what ways will raw speed empower them?

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Gartenberg: iPad is Here and it Delivers

Gartenberg: iPad is Here and it Delivers

It's the device that fueled nearly a decade of rumor and speculation. While the iPad isn’t officially available until today, I'm been pleased to have a final, production unit ahead of the formal launch. I've been testing a 64GB iPad WiFi device and so far I've been impressed with what Apple has delivered.

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When you leave your laptop behind

When you leave your laptop behind

We've all heard how the phone in your pocket is really a PC. Well, a few weeks ago I put that to the test literally. I left for a week of heavy business travel in three cities to see if my phone (actually a series of phones) could replace my MacBook Pro. For my tests, I carried an iPhone 3GS with a Mophie JuicePack Air, a Palm Pre Plus and an HTC HD2. I also had a Stowaway Bluetooth Keyboard which works with the HD2.

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