Author Archives: Chris Davies

Writing for R3 Media since 2006, Chris Davies is currently executive editor for SlashGear and Android Community. Based in London, UK, he's responsible for SlashGear's editorial decisions and covers all forms of consumer technology. You can follow him on Twitter.

BMW and Mercedes team on wireless car charging

BMW and Mercedes team on wireless car charging

BMW and Mercedes-Benz are teaming up on wireless car charging, pushing a super-efficient way of refueling EVs like the BMW i8 and the Mercedes S500 Plug-In Hybrid simply by parking over a certain spot on your driveway. The system, which the two German marques hope to get accepted as the de-facto standard for wireless car recharging, promises a cut in charge times without the hassle of having to regularly plug in: BMW says the batteries in its i8 supercar, for instance, can be topped up in under two hours.

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Netflix user on Verizon? Your buffering days may soon be over

Netflix user on Verizon? Your buffering days may soon be over

If you're a Verizon internet customer and you've been getting increasingly frustrated with Netflix buffering, a fix may be at hand, with a new deal with the on-demand video service that it says should prevent the glitches and pauses that even high-speed FiOS customers have been complaining of. Still, even as the collaborative fixes go into play, Verizon can't help but throw the blame for the persistent issues onto Netflix itself.

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This self-cleaning car tech could change everything

This self-cleaning car tech could change everything

Rich chocolate syrup on a pure white car would usually be the trigger for a trip to the detailing shop, but this time around there's something different: like the black oil from the X-Files, the syrup beads up and oozes off the edge of the hood, leaving no trace that it was ever there. Nissan's calling it "the World's Cleanest Car," but there's more to this special Leaf EV than a fetching matte paint-job.

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Nissan invented something every car needs

Nissan invented something every car needs

What with airbags, electronic stability control, and crumple zones galore, you could be forgiven for thinking there was no safety feature left untouched on the modern car, but Nissan would prove you wrong. The humble rear-view mirror is next in line for a smart update, and as Nissan showed me with its prototype system, the way we look around our car is well overdue a high-tech update.

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The MOTO 360 is Motorola’s new RAZR

The MOTO 360 is Motorola’s new RAZR

Getting wearable critics cooing is difficult, but Motorola seems to have struck a nerve with the MOTO 360. The circular smartwatch may, at its heart, be simply another Android Wear device, yet its enthusiastic embracing of a new form-factor and the technologies to enable it have already cast a shadow over models from LG and Samsung. For once, buyers are planning to hold out and wait for the Motorola option, something increasingly rare in a market dominated by Apple and Samsung. In fact, you have to go a long way back in Motorola’s history to find anything similar: back to 2004, and the RAZR V3.

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Facebook mood test outrage is FUD claims ex-researcher

Facebook mood test outrage is FUD claims ex-researcher

One of the former Facebook data scientists at the heart of the recent controversy over mood manipulation and tests run on unwitting users has spoken out, claiming his quotes were taken out of context, and defending the social network's experimentation. Data scientist Andrew Ledvina, who left Facebook in April, was one of the originally quoted sources when the psychological research carried out by the site surfaced late last month, used to illustrate how Facebook lacked safe review processes for tests performed on its users. Now, Ledvina says that the reporter he spoke to mis-represented the facts.

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Self-driving cars need better people skills says Mercedes

Self-driving cars need better people skills says Mercedes

Self-driving cars like Google's distinctive little pods may not need us to drive them any more, but that just means we'll need a new way of communicating with them if we don't want to be run over in the street. That's the conclusion of new research led by Mercedes-Benz, which is working with robotics experts and linguists on ways that autonomous vehicles and pedestrians - or would-be passengers - might be able to talk with gestures and more.

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