Author Archives: Chris Davies

Writing for R3 Media since 2006, Chris Davies is currently executive editor for SlashGear and Android Community. Based in San Francisco, he's responsible for SlashGear's editorial decisions and covers all forms of consumer technology. You can follow him on Twitter.

iPad Pro’s stylus a Force Touch option tips analyst

iPad Pro’s stylus a Force Touch option tips analyst

Apple's much-rumored iPad Pro will treat the stylus as an option, but one you'll need if you want Force Touch style pressure support according to one analyst's predictions. Tipped to be a 12.9-inch tablet focusing on graphics and multimedia professionals, the iPad Pro is widely expected to be announced later this year, but according to KGI Securities analyst Ming Chi-Kuo it will have an official companion accessory never before seen with an Apple product.

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Audi e-tron quattro concept teases 2018’s all-electric SUV

Audi e-tron quattro concept teases 2018’s all-electric SUV

Audi will bring its luxury electric crossover concept to the Frankfurt Auto Show next month, previewing a Tesla-challenging e-tron SUV for 2018. The car, dubbed the Audi e-tron quattro concept, is the German marque's clearest design indication for its all-electric SUV plans so far, following on from the Prologue Allroad concept from earlier in the year. However, while the sheet metal is interesting, the most excitement happens underneath.

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Intel Tango phone hands-on: Android RealSense

Intel Tango phone hands-on: Android RealSense

Intel's RealSense 3D camera technology always seemed like a natural bedfellow with Google's Project Tango, and sure enough they've met up at IDF 2015. The Android phablet isn't expected to ship for developers until the end of the year, but Intel brought along a handful of prototypes - along with some apps to make use of them - to its annual event, which is where I caught up with the smartphones to see what's new.

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Smart vending machines are coming in 2016

Smart vending machines are coming in 2016

Vending machines that recognize you might not seem your first priority when you're desperate for a snack, but the US is about to be invaded by thousands of them. Automated retail behemoth N&W is planning to release a flock of 5,000 smart vending machines across America in 2016. They, Intel confirmed at its IDF 2015 opening keynote this morning, will be powered by a number of the tech company's products.

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Dragon Anywhere brings Nuance dictation to iPhone and Android

Dragon Anywhere brings Nuance dictation to iPhone and Android

Nuance may be part of the voice recognition magic behind Siri, but its latest product, Dragon Anywhere, promises to outclass the speech-to-text skills of both iOS and Android. The new app focuses on those who expect uninterrupted dictation from their mobile devices, along with full document editing, formatting, and even distribution done by voice. Ambitious, not least because both Apple and Google have baked some of those technologies straight into their platforms; I caught up with Nuance's Peter Mahoney, CMO, to find out more.

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NASA finally answers lingering lunar question

NASA finally answers lingering lunar question

The big experiments in space might seem like they're happening on Mars or even further afield, but NASA's latest discovery proves there's plenty to learn closer to home. Thanks to the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft, we now know that the atmosphere of our own moon contains neon, something suspected all the way back in the days of the Apollo missions, but until now unconfirmed.

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IBM’s crazy LinuxONE servers pitch open-source to mainstream

IBM’s crazy LinuxONE servers pitch open-source to mainstream

First nobody told IBM that servers were meant to be nondescript slabs, and now Big Blue has gone wild with Linux on its new open-source LinuxONE range. The angular behemoths look more like gaming PCs than they do enterprise hardware, but they open the door to what the Linux Foundation is calling its Open Mainframe Project, a push to better place open-source server software in businesses. IBM is kicking things off with a big chunk of code.

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Mercedes teases super-luxe S-Class Cabriolet

Mercedes teases super-luxe S-Class Cabriolet

Pebble Beach might have been jam-packed with luxury convertibles, but Mercedes-Benz thinks there's space for its own take on high end drop-top glamour. The S-Class Cabriolet has been cropping up in spy shots for some time now, and Mercedes has finally relented and shared a render of what the open-top should look like. Think along the lines of four seats and ridiculous levels of luxury.

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Facebook Notes wants to marginalize Medium

Facebook Notes wants to marginalize Medium

Facebook is quietly testing new blogging features that could turn its little-known Notes system into a long-form platform, taking on Medium in the process. Notes has allowed for longer statuses to be posted to a Facebook user's profile, shared either publicly or with only certain groups of friends, but a recent upgrade has added greater image, tagging, and other abilities for some users.

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Google Project Sunroof takes guesswork out of solar switch

Google Project Sunroof takes guesswork out of solar switch

Google is hoping to encourage more homeowners to fit rooftop solar panels, launching Project Sunroof to do the math on just how much could be saved. The system relies on the same aerial imagery that Google already delivers in Google Earth, figuring out rooftop area and then taking into account factors like what angle the sunlight will hit it, whether it's in the shade of nearby buildings or trees, and even what the weather might be like in your area.

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