Author Archives: Chris Davies

Writing for R3 Media since 2006, Chris Davies is currently executive editor for SlashGear and Android Community. Based in London, UK, he's responsible for SlashGear's editorial decisions and covers all forms of consumer technology. You can follow him on Twitter.

NASA’s drone airspace expert clamps down on enthusiasm

NASA’s drone airspace expert clamps down on enthusiasm

The drone expert leading NASA's air traffic control scheme for autonomous flying vehicles expects the first applications to begin "inside of the next year," though warns drone deliveries aren't likely to get anywhere near mainstream for another five years. Dr Parimal H. Kopardekar, who manages NASA's NextGen-Airspace Project, predicted that agricultural monitoring using drones is likely to be the first application to get the green-light, as concerns around autonomous and remote-control vehicle safety in urban environments continue.

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Moto X+1 leaks again with M-logo button

Moto X+1 leaks again with M-logo button

Motorola's new Moto X+1 just can't stay hidden, with the new Android smartphone continuing to spring up in the wild ahead of its expected official reveal later this week. The new flagship phone is believed to be among a multi-product line-up featuring at an event in Chicago on Thursday, but new leaks shed further light on its specifications and some of its more unusual features.

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Would you pay $400 for an Apple wearable?

Would you pay $400 for an Apple wearable?

Apple is considering a $400 price tag for its mysterious wearable devices, sources suggest, which if the Cupertino firm's eventual strategy would put it at the upper end of the market. The device - which, according to the latests rumors, could be announced at Apple's September 9th event alongside the iPhone 6, but not actually launch until sometime in the new year - is believed to be one of an eventual range of wearable devices that could include the so-called iWatch.

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Intel Core i7 Extreme Processors revealed

Intel Core i7 Extreme Processors revealed

Intel has taken the wraps off of its latest flagship performance processors, the Extreme line, formerly known as Haswell-E. The trio of chips - the Core i7-5820K, Core i7-5930K, and Core i7-5960X - and the new Intel X99 Express chipset that launches alongside them target gaming and multimedia systems, with up to eight cores and clock speeds as high as 3.9GHz.

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Alienware Area-51: The gaming desktop just got wilder

Alienware Area-51: The gaming desktop just got wilder

Alienware has revealed its latest flagship gaming PC, the Area-51, using Intel's new Core i7 Extreme processors in a striking triangular form-factor. Inside, as we found out when we caught up with Alienware to try out the Area-51, there's space for three full-sized, double-width graphics cards too, plus lashings of DDR4 RAM. The Area-51 isn't just about cranking up the level of performance from the top-end of Alienware's range, though, it's also about introducing a whole new aesthetic, this time dubbed "EPIC".

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Project MRSC Connected Smart-Bike gets you online

Project MRSC Connected Smart-Bike gets you online

A new connected smart-bike integrating the best of mobile data and supercar-style suspension has been cooked up by Canyon and Deutsche Telekom, expected to show up for road trials early in the new year. Dubbed Project MRSC Connected - after the "Magneto-Rheological Suspension Control" (MRSC) - the bike links a new carbon leaf spring suspension system with a cellularly-enabled brain, as well as a network of sensors throughout the frame.

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Keurig 2.0 DRM already cracked for coffee freedom

Keurig 2.0 DRM already cracked for coffee freedom

Keurig 2.0, also known as "Keurig tries to lock out rival pod-coffee suppliers by applying DRM to its new machines", has seemingly hit a stumbling block, with the lock-down system apparently already cracked by rival brands. The system, revealed back in May and a feature on Keurig's current range, borrows from the printer ink market in preventing brewers from working with unlicensed pods and instead forcing them to buy Keurig's "approved" supplies.

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