Author Archives: Chaim Gartenberg

Chaim Gartenberg is a senior at TABC, in New Jersey. He writes a technology blog for young adults at genupload.com. Contact him at Cgartenberg AT gmail DOT com. Views expressed here are his own.

Multifunction Devices and Teens

Multifunction Devices and Teens

Multitasking is a huge concept for devices today. The idea of a single use, single feature device is becoming increasingly rare. Today, the lines are really blurring in technology - between mobile and desktop devices, between phones and media players, between TVs and computers. Even alarm clocks have WiFi built in. And especially among teenagers, the idea of multipurpose, connected devices is becoming more and more important.

For teenagers, one of the most important concept of our lives is being connected to each other - we like being in touch with all our social circles, be it for friends around the corner from school to friends across the globe. Media, entertainment, and pictures are also huge features - consider the huge importance of music, movies, video games, and Facebook albums in today’s world. And in portable devices especially it’s become more and more critical to have these features to ensure that you appeal to teens.

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GenUpload: Two weeks with KIN

GenUpload: Two weeks with KIN

A few weeks back, I wrote my first impressions of Microsoft’s new KIN phones, and their appeal specifically to the different way teenagers use cellphones. But understanding the intent of the KIN and a few hours of testing wasn’t really enough to get a real picture of how well it would actually work as a phone for teenagers. So, for two weeks, I shelved my featurephone and iPod Touch, and went with just a KIN (in this case, the KIN 2).

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KIN: A View from GenUpload

KIN: A View from GenUpload

A few weeks ago, Microsoft made some big headlines when they announced their latest phone, the KIN - specifically designed for teenagers. People all over the Internet had comments on it, positive and negative - but here’s a take from the target audience – an actual teenager.

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